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    Consolidating the High School Small-Schools Model for Improved Quality and Efficiency

    Frequently Asked Questions 

    1. Why is Atlanta Public Schools (APS) consolidating the Small-Schools model in high schools and merging the middle and high schools at each of the single-gender schools?
    There are several small schools in APS. The District will consolidate the small-schools in its high schools and merge the single-gender middle and high schools in order to improve the quality and efficiency. Additionally, separate administrative structures led to a lack of alignment and coherence among high schools with small schools, and their feeder elementary and middle schools despite best efforts to collaborate. Duplicate administrative and staffing structures are inefficient and result in significant additional overhead.
    While we refer to this as a consolidation because we are merging schools and not closing buildings, the Georgia State Department of Education considers this to be a school closure.
     
    2. When will this change take place?
    Pending Atlanta Board of Education and State Department of Education approvals, APS will implement these changes beginning in 2015-2016 school year. Each campus will have a transition plan that is specific to the needs of that school community.
     
    3. Why is APS calling this a closure and consolidation of the small schools?
    We are consolidating our small schools into one school. No actual school buildings will be closed; however, according to the State Department of Education this is statutorily considered a closure.
     
    4. When will the closure and consolidation of small schools be official?
    The Atlanta Board of Education will consider the recommendation to consolidate the small schools during its April 13, 2015 legislative meeting. Pending Atlanta Board of Education and State Department of Education approvals, the change will take effect beginning in the 2015-2016 school year for B.E.S.T, CSKYWLA and Therrell and in the 2016-2017 school year for Carver and South Atlanta.
     
    5. Where will my child go to school?
    Pending approvals from the Atlanta Board of Education and the Georgia Department of Education, students will remain on their respective campuses and will be assigned as follows:

    • B.E.S.T. Academy middle and high school students will attend the B.E.S.T. 6-12 Academy with one principal.

    • CSKYWLA middle and high school students will attend CSKYWLA 6-12 with one principal.

    • Carver School of Technology will merge with Carver Early College and students will attend Carver Early College.

    • Carver school of the Arts and Carver Health, Science and Research will merge into one school—Carver High School.

    • South Atlanta School of Computer Animation and Design, South Atlanta School of Law & Social Justice and South Atlanta School of Health & Medical Sciences will merge into one school—South Atlanta High School.

    • Therrell School of Health Science & Research, School of Law, Government & Public Policy, and School of Technology, Engineering, Math & Science will merge into one school—D.M. Therrell High School.
     
    6. What will happen to the theme of the schools?
    Atlanta Public Schools will not eliminate the themes of the schools unless suggested by the cluster plans. Under the new comprehensive approach, more students will have access to expanded course offerings and greater access to pathway offerings will be afforded to all students on each campus. More importantly, this will offer more access to Advanced Placement and Career, Technical and Agricultural courses and pathway offerings. To ensure college and career readiness, each school will offer a more robust instructional program to meet the needs of their students under the comprehensive approach.
     
    7. How can the public provide comments on the plan to close the small schools?
    As required by state law, Atlanta Public Schools held public hearings on the future of the small schools model at its high schools, and the creation of 6-12 academies at each of its single-gender schools. The community had two opportunities to offer comments during community meetings between March 10-12 and March 16-19 for each of the impacted schools. Principals and associate superintendents continue to be available to receive input throughout this process. In addition, comments and questions can be e-mailed to smallschools@atlantapublicschools.us. For more information, please visit www.atlantapublicschools.us/smallschools.
     
    8. Will there be any vacant buildings as result of school consolidations?
    No. There will be no vacant buildings as a result of the consolidation of small schools. The existing buildings will be used.
     
    9. Will my school be removed from the focus or priority status list when the small schools close? Can we choose to merge with the school with the highest ranking?
    We have been working with the state to better understand how this will work. According to the Georgia Department of Education (DOE), the closed/consolidated school will inherit the priority status of the lowest-performing school. Priority focus is determined by the Georgia DOE once every three years. Because of high performance, some of our schools will have the opportunity to come off the priority list quickly.
     
    10. Will my school be subject to becoming an Opportunity School District (OSD) school where the state could take over our schools?
    In the governor’s proposal for an Opportunity School District, persistently failing schools are defined as those scoring below 60 on the Georgia Department of Education’s accountability measure, the College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI), for three consecutive years. Starting with school year 2014 under this plan, all schools classified as persistently failing using the aforementioned definition, will become eligible for the Opportunity School District (OSD). The Governor’s plan must be approved by voters in 2016. If approved, we do not know which schools will be selected for the OSD at this time.
     
    11. APS said in 2012 that small schools were supposed to create personalized learning environments where students could get the individual help they needed. If APS eliminates the small schools, how will my student succeed in a larger environment with two or three times the number of students?
    Consolidating our small schools will allow for an increase in the courses and learning opportunities afforded to students; it will not diminish the relationships that students have forged with teachers in the small schools. Class sizes in the consolidated schools will comply with board approved class size parameters, as in previous years.

    Evidence of the effectiveness of small schools is mixed; however, a greater predictor of student success is not class size or school size, but rather access to a quality teacher in the classroom. Nationally, a growing body of research shows that student achievement is more heavily influenced by teacher quality than by students’ race, class, prior academic record, or school a student attends. This effect is particularly strong among students from low-income families and African American students. The benefits associated with being taught by good teachers are cumulative. Research indicates the achievement gap widens each year between students with most effective teachers and those with least effective teachers. This suggests the most significant gains in student achievement will likely be realized when students receive instruction from good teachers over consecutive years.

    APS has invested heavily in quality teaching and learning, and individualized instruction will continue as we focus on differentiated strategies to support learning for our students.
     
    12. How will closing the small schools and eliminating some teachers impact class sizes? Will the student/teacher ratios increase?
    Teaching positions will be allocated to the consolidated schools utilizing the same formula as all other schools, which is based upon the total number of courses that will be taught in each school to meet students’ course requests, ensure students are able to meet graduation requirements and in compliance with approved class sizes.
     
    13. Why is the timeline so aggressive? Why not have a transition year before closing the small schools?
    The school consolidation is a part of the district’s effort to right-size and ensure that staff are allocated to schools to meet the instructional needs of students. In previous years, there were external funding sources that allowed APS to continue the support of small schools. Further, many of the small schools have longstanding performance challenges. Through the budgeting and academic review process, we determined that we can no longer sustain the small-schools model. This process was initiated last school year with Washington and Therrell high school students.

    A transition year must be approved by the State Department of Education and is only considered if there is compelling evidence that a hardship exists that will cause significant obstacles for which APS must overcome in order to fully consolidate small schools for the next school year. Therrell just completed its transition year. We propose to request this flexibility from the Georgia Department of Education for both the schools at Carver and South Atlanta.
     
    14. What will happen to our school culture?
    Starting the work to build “one school” is essential to drive improved collaboration, communication, teaming and academic focus on a mission that must be about college and career readiness. APS will engage student leaders as part of the planning process to bring the school community together. APS will also use programs such as Positive Student Behavioral Support System and No Place for Hate to help bring the student body together to strengthen school culture, thereby reducing discipline issues and improving safety and security. Teacher culture-building activities will be conducted and include use of the Professional Learning Communities. APS will provide teacher training to focus on what students are learning, their strengths and deficits, and next steps. The school will benefit from a strengthened sense of community through establishing an aligned PTA and LSC structure.
     
    15. How are you going to provide for the needs of students with special needs?
    Students will continue to receive services based on their Individual Education Plans (IEP). IEP services drive staffing needs, regardless of the building where students are currently being served. Case managers, special education leadership teams (SELTS), and coordinators assigned to affected schools will keep parents informed of next year’s scheduling decisions as they currently do at their schools.
     
    16. What will happen to the juniors in line to be the valedictorians and salutatorians for the closed schools? Will they be eligible for their scholarships (Zell Miller & GA Tech)?
    For 2014-2015, each small school is eligible to designate one valedictorian and salutatorian. Rising seniors/current juniors will engage in a competitive process for the distinction of valedictorian and salutatorian. Once the schools are combined, there will be only one valedictorian and salutatorian. Scholarships are subject to the requirements and limitations of the issuing institution or entity.
     
    17. How much will eliminating the Small Schools model save the district?
    The primary reason for this change is that the district believes it is best for children. All students deserve access to a quality and rigorous education. While we have seen pockets of success, not all schools or students have succeeded under the small schools model. In addition, the small schools model is inefficient and is costing the district significantly per student. School spending data from 2014 show high schools using the small school model cost the district an additional $1,278 per student. Between the efficiencies associated with consolidation the redundant administrative and the district-wide rightsizing initiatives, we estimate saving approximately $5.2M across the four campuses. These savings are being reinvested in the budget to support critical budget priorities, including initiatives related to college and career readiness for high school students.
     
    18. How many employees could lose their jobs?
    There will be approximately 52 employees out of 463 across the four small school campuses directly impacted by the consolidation of schools. Every impacted employee in good standing will have the opportunity to apply for open positions within the district.Staff reducts school consolidation
     
     
    19. What will be the teacher-student ratio if you are increasing the capacity?
    Teaching positions will be allocated to the consolidated schools utilizing the same formula as all other schools, which is based upon the total number of courses that will be taught in each school to meet students’ course requests, ensure students are able to meet graduation requirements and in compliance with board approved class sizes. The district cannot exceed the state maximum class size for which we have been approved.
     
    20. Where is the data to support this decision to close the small schools?
    Results of the small schools high school model are mixed. Grant funding we received to initiate and support small schools expired. Though we had positive gains in some areas, the small high school model is not financially sustainable.
     
    School spending data from 2014 shows high schools using the small school model cost the district an additional $1,278 per student. Between the efficiencies associated with consolidation the redundant administrative and the district-wide rightsizing initiatives, we estimate saving approximately $5.2M across the four campuses. These savings are being reinvested in the budget to support critical budget priorities, including initiatives related to college and career readiness for high school students.
     
    21. Is there time to properly implement this change before the 2015-2016 school year?
    Yes. While the timeline to consolidate the small schools is accelerated, we are working with a cross functional team and relying on experience and plans from previous school mergers and consolidations to guide our work. Due to the complexity of their consolidations, a transition year is being proposed for the Carver and South Atlanta campuses.
     
    22. Who will be my school's new principal?
    The district will conduct an open search for highly qualified candidates, which includes looking at internal candidates to serve as principal. Vacant positions will be filled using the district hiring guidelines to select the best candidate. If a current principal is not selected, he or she will have the opportunity to apply for other positions within the district. A community interview panel will be convened to conduct interviews and provide feedback to the superintendent by April 17.

    An online survey is available for each school community to provide input into the principal selection process:
     
    B.E.S.T. Academy https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolBEST
     
    Carver https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolcarver
     
    Coretta Scott King https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolCSK
     
    South Atlanta https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolSouthAtlanta
     
    It is our goal to have the principal identified by the first week of May, or no later than the start of the school year.
     
    23. What is your vision and plan for career and college technical readiness?
    To ensure that all students are prepared for college and careers, our courses are aligned to state standards, which reflect the necessary content and skills students need to succeed in college and on the job. The standards are clear, focused, and we work to ensure the standards drive classroom instruction.

    Our students meet course requirements that ensure they are prepared for college and careers. We recognize that preparation for college and the workplace has converged; therefore, our graduation requirements reflect this reality.

    Considerable effort will be placed in coming years to ensure that all students have access to rigorous academic courses. This is especially important for our low-income and minority students, who too often lack equitable access to the rigorous curriculum they need to succeed. In order for our high school graduates to be prepared for college and good jobs, they will need to take four years of challenging mathematics, at least through Advanced Algebra and four years of rigorous English. But we recognize that mathematics and English alone will not prepare our students for success after high school. Students also need a well-rounded curriculum that includes courses in science, social studies, arts, and foreign languages and career and technical courses.
     
    24. What is APS doing about the safety and security issues that will come with merging formally separate groups of students?
    APS is aware that merging student populations can bring unique challenges; however, recent experiences with school mergers at Washington, Therrell and King middle school reflect that with planning and strong leadership, safety and security issues can be mitigated.
     
    25. How will APS address gang and culture issues associated with merging schools where divisions exist?
    This is a community wide issue; however, we are working closely with school safety officers and Atlanta Police Department to monitor and deescalate potential conflicts. The good news is that the officers who are currently assigned on campus know all of the students because they work across the entire campus. The school resource officers’ duties will include active patrol inside the school and roving patrols in parking lots. We will work with the school leadership and associate superintendent to ensure security personnel are involved in merging training activities, and orientation meet-and-greets to increase interaction between officers and students. Enhanced security measures are already underway with many of them completed.
     
     

    Following are frequently asked questions (FAQ) for each of the impacted schools: 

     
    26. Why is APS consolidating B.E.S.T. middle and high school?
    APS is consolidating the middle and high schools at both B.E.S.T. and CSKYWLA. This means that APS will merge the school to create a 6-12 grade school at each of the single-gender schools, under one principal on their respective campuses. B.E.S.T. and CSKYWLA are the smallest middle and high schools in APS, making it difficult to maximize the economies of scale. Separate administrative structures led to a lack of alignment and coherence between middle and high schools despite best efforts to collaborate. Duplicate administrative and staffing structures are inefficient and result in significant additional overhead on both campuses.

    APS will retain each of the single-gender academies; the boys and girls schools are not merging together. However, in the case of B.E.S.T. Academy, the school will combine its middle and high schools resulting in the creation of one single-gender academy for grades 6-12 grade. At CSKYWLA, the school will combine its girls’ middle school and girls’ high school into one single-gender academy for girls in grades 6-12.
     
    27. Is APS merging or combining B.E.S.T. and CSKYWLA into one school?
    No. B.E.S.T. and Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy (CSKYWLA) will remain separate single-gender schools. B.E.S.T. is combining its middle and high schools into a single-gender 6-12 boys school under the leadership of one principal. CSKYWLA will remain a single-gender school for our girls and will combine its middle and high schools into a 6-12 grade school under the leadership of one principal.
     
    28. How will APS keep the older students from bullying the middle school students at the new single-gender 6-12 school at B.E.S.T.?
    As is currently the case, the buildings will maintain a physical separation between the middle and high schools, however one leader at each of the single-gender schools will be responsible for administering and ensuring that quality academic teaching and learning occurs across the entire 6-12 grade campus. Additionally, the principal will work closely with his her leadership team, each school will be adequately staffed with assistant principals and other leadership staff to manage the school and ensure safety. APS will use programs such as Positive Student Behavioral Support System and No Place for Hate to help bring the student body together to strengthen school culture, thereby reducing discipline issues and improving safety and security.
     
    29. When did the plan to consolidate schools come into existence?
    There have been having ongoing conversations in the district about effectiveness of the small schools. Part of the budget process that was launched at the beginning of the 2014-15 school year included a review of prior school consolidation efforts.
     
    30. Who will be the principal at B.E.S.T.?
    The district will conduct an open search for highly qualified candidates, which includes looking at internal candidates to serve as principal. Vacant positions will be filled using the district hiring guidelines to select the best candidate. If the current principal is not selected, he or she will have the opportunity to apply for other positions within the district. A community interview panel will be convened to conduct interviews and provide feedback to the superintendent by April 17.
     
    The community can provide input into the principal selection at B.E.S.T. Academy via online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolBEST
     
    31. What will the staff allocations look like at B.E.S.T.?
    BEST Acad staff allocations
    *These allocations reflect only general funded positions and do not include special revenue funded positions.
     
    The principal will have the autonomy to build his or her team with input from the associate superintendent, using the staffing and budget allocation received. We also encourage the principal to collaborate with staff and school community.

    The principal will lead the work on the design needs approaching this from the high school perspective, since it is our goal to graduate students prepared for college careers.
     
     
     
    32. Is APS merging or combining B.E.S.T. and CSKYWLA into one school?
    No. B.E.S.T. and Coretta Scott King Young Women’s Leadership Academy (CSKYWLA) will remain separate single-gender schools. B.E.S.T. is combining its middle and high schools into a single-gender 6-12 boys school under the leadership of one principal. CSKYWLA will remain a single-gender school for our girls and will combine its middle and high schools into a 6-12 grade school under the leadership of one principal.
     
    33. Who will be the principal at CSKYWLA?
    The district will conduct an open search for highly qualified candidates, which includes looking at internal candidates to serve as principal. Vacant positions will be filled using the district hiring guidelines to select the best candidate. If the current principal is not selected, he or she will have the opportunity to apply for other positions within the district. A community interview panel will be convened to conduct interviews and provide feedback to the superintendent by April 17.
     
    34. How can the community provide input into the principal selection at Coretta Scott King?
    The community can provide input into the principal selection at CSKYWLA Academy via online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolCSK.
     
    35. What will the staff allocations look like at CSKYWLA? 
    CSK YWLA staff allocates
    *These allocations reflect only general funded positions and do not include special revenue funded positions.
     
    The principal will have the autonomy to build his or her team with input from the Office of High Schools, using the staffing and budget allocation received. We also encourage the principal to collaborate with staff and school community.

    The principal will lead the work on the design needs approaching this from the high school perspective, since it is our goal to graduate students.
     
     
     
    36. What is changing at Carver?
    Carver School of Technology will close and merge with Carver Early College--expanding to increase the number of students in Early College. Carver School of the Arts and School of Health Science & Research will merge into one school to establish the new Carver High School. There will be two principals on the Carver Campus beginning in the 2015-2016 school year although the formal school closure will take place at the end of the 2015-2016 school year.
     
    37. Who will be my school's new principal at Carver High School?
    The district will conduct an open search for highly qualified candidates, which includes looking at internal candidates to serve as principal. Vacant positions will be filled using the district hiring guidelines to select the best candidate. If the current principal is not selected, he or she will have the opportunity to apply for other positions within the district. A community interview panel will be convened to conduct interviews and provide feedback to the superintendent by April 17.
     
    The community can provide input into the Carver high school principal selection at Carver via online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolcarver.
     
    38. What will the staff allocations look like at Carver High School?
    Carver HS staff allocates
     

    Carver Early College 

     
    39. Who will be my school's new principal at Carver High School?
    The current principal of Carver Early College will remain the principal of Carver Early College. The district will conduct a search for the newly established Carver High School.
     
    40. Why is APS keeping Carver Early College?
    Carver Early College has a history of repeated and consistent success since its inception 10 years ago. APS wants to maintain the established early college program that has earned both state and national recognition. Moreover, merging the school of Technology into Early College provides increased access to this successful model.
     
    41. How can I get my child into Carver Early College?
    Students who wish to enroll in the Carver Early College program can notify (through course selection) the principal or school counselor of their interest in Early College. However, the Early College program is a rigorous program with the intent of getting students to attend college in their junior year. There is a requirement that students are reading on grade level and demonstrate proficiency in mathematics.

    Under the proposed consolidation plan students interested in Early College and Technology programs will enroll at Carver Early College. The pathways to complete both programs will continue as they are at the separate Carver Early College and Carver School of Technology. Carver Early College will establish a memorandum of agreement with Atlanta Technical College to ensure that students choosing the Technology program have access to college courses that allow an alternative pathway to completion of courses of study.

    Regardless of the school, we will ensure every student receives a quality education. The district will create expanded learning opportunities for students to accelerate or increase their skillsets and will continue using student support teams (SSTs) to assist students appropriately.
     
    42. My child is in Carver Early College; will you water down my school's programming?
    No. The Carver Early College program will retain the academic rigor for which it is known. The academic schedule and curriculum for this program is an accelerated one that affords students the opportunity to take college courses at partner colleges and universities starting in their junior year. Students’ preparation and access to the early college program is based upon the entrance requirements specified in the memorandum of agreement (MOA) with the partner colleges and universities.
     
    43. If you are expanding the capacity of Carver Early College, how will you keep the quality and standards high? Will there be entrance requirements for Carver Early College?
    The Carver Early College program will retain the academic rigor for which it is known. The academic schedule and curriculum for this program is an accelerated one that affords students the opportunity to take college courses at partner colleges and universities starting in their junior year. Students’ preparation and access to the early college program is based upon the entrance requirements specified in memorandums of agreement with partner colleges and universities.

    Under the proposed consolidation plan, students interested in Early College and Technology programs will enroll at Carver Early College. The pathways to complete both programs will continue as they have been at the separate Carver Early College and Carver School of Technology. While there will be no entrance requirements for students to enter the school itself, in order to successfully complete the Early College program, students must meet entrance requirements established by the partner college or university. APS cannot waive the entry requirements for the Early College program that are established by MOA with partner colleges and universities.

    Carver Early College will establish a memorandum of agreement with Atlanta Technical College to ensure that students choosing the Technology program have access to college courses that allow an alternative pathway to completion of courses of study.
     
    44. What are the entry criteria for Carver Early College?
    Students who enter the consolidated Carver Early College high school will have the opportunity to choose from one of two programs:

    1) Early College

    2) Technology

    • While there are no entrance requirements for students to enter the school itself, in order to successfully complete the Early College program, students must meet entrance requirements for the partner college or university.
    • The entrance criteria for the Carver Early College program is based upon agreements with each partner college or university (Georgia State University, Atlanta Metro and Atlanta Tech.)
    • APS cannot waive the entrance requirements of the partner college or university.

    Students enter the Early College program with an understanding that they are enrolled to prepare for college courses by the start of their 11th grade year. (NOTE: Twilight School and Saturday School are often required to meet this expectation.)
     
    45. What steps are planned to help Carver Early College (CEC) retain its designation as a high performing school? If my understanding is correct, when we are blended with a "priority" school, we will be listed as a failing school/priority school with the State. Please help us avoid such a desperate status.
    According to staff in the GaDOE Accountability Office, if a school with the priority designation is consolidated with another, the combined school will assume the priority designation. In this instance, we are requesting approval from the state to allow a transition year. This will give the staff of the two schools an opportunity to address the trend of poor student performance that prompted the state designation and continue the intervention programs that are vital to support student learning.
     
    46. How can we accommodate for the educational needs of special needs students who may find it challenging to meet the criteria of the schools?
    APS had an obligation to provide Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) to all of our students with disabilities. We will do everything in our power to provide access to our programs via appropriate modifications and accommodations as required under the IDEA. Whether or not the services offered at the Carver Early College are appropriate for a particular student will be made on a case by case study by the Individualized Education Plan (IEP) team.
     
    47. What Is APS doing about the safety and security issues that will come with merging formally separate groups of students?
    The security personnel allocations will remain the same; however, the security staff will work closely with students, staff and parents to address the concerns and needs of each school. APS also has plans to install fencing at Carver to assist with controlling unauthorized pedestrian traffic.
     
    48. What will the staff allocations look like at Carver Early College? 
    Carver Early College staff allocates
    *These allocations reflect only general funded positions and do not include special revenue funded positions.
     
     
     
    49. What is changing at South Atlanta?
    APS will merge the three schools that are within the South Atlanta Educational Complex. South Atlanta School of Computer Animation & Design, South Atlanta School of Health & Medical Sciences and South Atlanta School of Law and Social Justice into one school with one principal.
     
    The community can provide input into the principal selection at South Atlanta via online survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/smschoolSouthAtlanta
     
    50. My School (South Atlanta CAD) just came off the needs improvement list, If the school is consolidated with the other schools that are performing less well academically, will the new school be placed back on the priority schools/need improvement list or be eligible for the Opportunity School District (OSD) that would allow the State of Georgia to take over our school?
    When the small schools at the South Atlanta Educational Complex merge, the consolidated school will likely assume the priority status of the lowest performing school. Under the current proposal for an Opportunity district, persistently failing schools are defined as those scoring below 60 on the Georgia Department of Education’s accountability measure, the College and Career Ready Performance Index (CCRPI), for three consecutive years. Schools classified as persistently failing, will become eligible for the Opportunity district under this proposal.

    Currently none of the small schools in the South Atlanta Educational Complex has a CCRPI score lower than 60. The 2014 CCRPI Scores for each school are as follows:

    • South Atlanta Law and Social Justice 71.7

    • South Atlanta Health and Medical Science 71.3

    • South Atlanta Computer Animation and Design 65.4
     
    51. What Is APS doing about the safety and security issues that will come with merging formally separate groups of students?
    The security personnel allocations will remain the same however; the security staff will work closely with student, staff and parents to address the concerns and needs of each school.
     
    52. What will the staff allocations look like at South Atlanta?
     
    S. Atlanta staff allocations  
    *These allocations reflect only general funded positions and do not include special revenue funded positions. 
     
     
     
    53. What is changing at Therrell?
    APS will merge D.M. Therrell School of Health Science & Research, School of Law, Government & Public Policy and School of Technology, Engineering, Math & Science into a single comprehensive high school. Since Therrell is currently in transition and its three schools are operating with one principal, students and parents will not notice major changes at their school as a result of this process.
     
    54. I thought APS already eliminated the small schools at D.M. Therrell. How does this change the way Therrell is operating now?
    Therrell began the 2014-2015 school year operating as a consolidated high school. We are simply formalizing the process that was already begun by officially closing the small schools at Therrell. Students and parents will not notice major changes at their school as a result of this process.

    APS has been working hard to improve academic quality and efficiencies in its high schools. In 2014, APS began the work of consolidating Booker T. Washington and D.M. Therrell high schools. Washington consolidated its separate small schools in 2014 and now operates as a consolidated or comprehensive high school under the leadership of one principal. Therrell is in a transition year for 2015-16 with the changes becoming permanent in 2016-2017.
     
    55. What will the staff allocations look like at Therrell?
     Therrell staff allocations
    *These allocations reflect only general funded positions and do not include special revenue funded positions.  
     
      
     
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