• Remind

     

     October/November Counseling Newsletter: https://www.smore.com/zkq3b

     

    Why High School Counselors? 

    High school years are full of growth, promise, excitement, frustration, disappointment and hope. It is the time when students begin to discover what the future holds for them. Secondary school counselors enhance the learning process and promote academic achievement. School counseling programs are essential for students to achieve optimal personal growth, acquire positive social skills and values, set appropriate career goals and realize full academic potential to become productive, contributing members of the world community.

    Need an Appointment?

    Students who want to meet with their counselor should schedule an appointment in the School Counseling Office. Students are required to have a pass from their teacher to meet with their counselor during class time.Parents who would like to schedule an appointment with the counselors should call or e-mail the counseling counselor assigned to serve their child.

     

    Secondary School Counselors Collaborate with: 

    Parents 
    Academic planning/support 
    Post-secondary planning 
    Scholarship/financial search process 
    School-to-parent communications 
    School-to-work transition programs 
    One-on-one parent conferencing 
    Referral process 

    Students
    Academic support services 
    Program planning 
    Peer education program 
    Peer mediation program 
    Crisis management 
    Transition programs 

    Teachers
    Providing recommendations and assisting students with the post-secondary application process 
    Classroom guidance lessons on post-secondary planning, study skills, career development, etc. 
    School-to-work transition programs 
    Academic support, learning style assessment and education to help students succeed academically 
    Classroom speakers 

    Administrators
    Academic support interventions 
    Behavioral management plans 
    School-wide needs assessments 
    Data sharing 
    Student assistance team development 

    Community
    Job shadowing, worked-based learning, part-time jobs, etc. 
    Crisis interventions 
    Referrals 
    Career education

     

    Our Counselors

     aldridge

    Carla Aldridge holds a Bachelor's Degree in Criminal Justice, Master's Degree in Counseling and a Specialist Degree in Educational Leadership. She began her career as a Therapeutic Clinician at Charter Hospital in Jackson, Mississippi. After years working as a Therapist, she shifted her interest to the educational school setting. She has served as a K-12 Instructional Counselor as well as Gifted Coordinator. Her philosophy in counseling includes a team approach in exploring the student's personal/social and academic needs to promte success. She is the proud parent of a twenty-three year old son. 

    caldridge@atlanta.k12.ga.us

     

    Wanetta King

     

    Ms. Wanetta M. King is originally from Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  She started her career in school counseling in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at Messmer High School and continued working as a counselor at Alief Hastings High School in Houston, Texas.  She is now a proud counselor at South Atlanta High School.

    With each location I can say I have been blessed to know I am helping future generations become leaders in our community.  Every day I wake up knowing that the work I do has purpose and meaning.  My professional qualifications include more than 18 years of combined solid hands-on experience as a Lead Counselor and School Counselor in high school settings and as an Academic Advisor in higher education. I have worked with a culturally diverse student population that includes special needs, gifted, and at-risk populations. To complement this skill set, I offer a broad based background as a facilitator and am highly adept in program management. I believe that every child can learn and we as educators have to find that tool that helps them “get it”.  One of my favorite quotes is “If You’re Not at the Table, You’re on the Menu”, so I consistently reiterate to my students that they have to be the decision maker for their futures otherwise others will decide their future for them.  So  I encourage them to take bold moves, push fear aside and go for it.  I have an open door policy so I look forward to working with the students, the parents, staff, and the city of Atlanta to help our young scholars reach the stars. 

     Wanetta.King@atlanta.k12.ga.us

     

    Springfield

    Mr. Springfield is currently in his 16th year as a Professional School Counselor. He has served in many leadership roles during his tenure in secondary education. Mr. Springfield loves being a change agent for children and strives to ensure that he is developing students Academically, Emotionally and Socially on a daily basis. His passion to develop leaders and socially conscious students is what drives him from day to day. Mr. Springfield is an avid  basketball and tennis player. He travels often and loves to immerse himself into different cultures. He is jazz aficionado…understanding that “music is the key to the soul. Mr. Springfield is the proud father of three children.  

    Please feel free to contact Mr. Springfield if you have any questions or concerns about your student. His email and office numbers are listed below.

    Jspringfield@atlanta.k12.ga.us

    (404) 802-5063 Office

    (404) 802-9816 Fax

    Mr. Springfield encourages all parents to ensure that their students have accounts established on the following websites.  

    1. collegeboard.org (SAT registration and SAT preparation materials)
    2. act.org (ACT registration and ACT preparation materials)
    3. gafutures.org (Interest Inventories, Career Search, College Search)

    Mr. Springfield encourages that “ALL” parents and students start the search for scholarships now! Although students typically won’t start applying until their senior year, it’s never too early to start exploring the multitude of scholarships that are available.

    1. fastweb.com
    2. scholarship.com
    3. collegenet.com

     

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