•           Our Board Member                                   
    Ms. Muhammad visits C.W.Hill
     
    Brenda Muhammad is the executive director of the Atlanta Victim Assistance, Inc. (AVA), an organization that advocates for the fundamental rights of victims and witnesses of crime with compassion, dignity and respect. AVA provides comprehensive services which remove barriers, strengthen victims and their families and foster a healthy transition from victim to survivor.

    Passionate about children and their educational needs, particularly those who are underserved, Brenda currently serves as the School Board Representative for District 1. She has also served the Atlanta School Board in times past as president and vice president.

    Turning a family tragedy into triumph, Brenda founded Mothers of Murdered Sons & Daughters (MOMS), and serves as current President. MOMS is dedicated to stopping the plague of violence in communities. Brenda’s efforts and tenacity in the area of violence prevention has elevated her into the national spotlight through her diligence and struggle to turn survivors of adversity into activists for change. Now a nationwide organization, MOMS provide programs that advocate for the rights of victims and family survivors who have loss loved ones due to violence.

    For 12 years Brenda served as president of a public relations and communications firm, Unique Affairs/Communications Inc. and was directly responsible for the planning and implementation of numerous special events and projects for various constituencies. She has also dedicated countless hours to local and national political campaigns as candidate, campaign manager and political consultant.

    Her community Involvement includes past and present service on the following boards and organizations: the Board of Directors of Atlanta Educational Telecommunications Collaborative, Inc.; Georgia Association of Black Elected Officials Corporate Roundtable; NFL-YET Boys and Girls Club; National Kidney Foundation; National Coalition for Survivors of Homicide; Carrie Steel Pitts Home. She is also a member of NAACP; Southside PTA; Georgians United Against Violence; South Atlanta Neighborhood Development; Rollins School of Public Health Organ Donor Commission; National Black Women’s Political Caucus; National Coalition of 100 Black Women; Weed and Seed Advisory Board; American Red Cross Minority Recruitment Advisory Board; South Atlanta Neighborhood Development; Leadership Atlanta Class of 1996; Buckhead Leadership Academy Class of 1998; 2002 Coca-Cola Diversity Leadership Academy and Zeta Phi Beta Sorority.

    She is the recipient of numerous awards including: Public Service Award from Morris Brown College; the Atlanta Business League’s “Woman of the Year Award”; Fulton High School Public Service Award; Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco & Firearms “Outstanding Support Award”; National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice’s “Community Service Award”; Georgia’s Reform for Families & Children’s “Social Welfare Award”; Turner Broadcasting Systems’ “Super 17 Award”; Georgia Alliance for Children’s “Outstanding Public Service Award”; National Association of Black Social Workers Award; Covenant Ministries’ “Vision Award”; Victim Witness Survivors Award; North Atlanta High School’s “Invaluable Service Award”; SWAYBO’s “Community Service Award”; Georgia Legislative Black Caucus’ “Volunteer of the Year Award”; Corporate Roundtable Foundation’s “Corporate Community Leadership Award”; Atlanta Business League’s “Community Service Award”; Department of Justice’s “ATF Leadership Award”; Morehouse Research Institute’s “Research in Action Award”; Sara Lee Corporation’s “Woman of Achievement Award” and the “Women Looking Ahead Award”. She has been featured in Atlanta Women’s Magazine as Diva. Ms. Muhammad has also received local and national service awards for her efforts to address problems related to reducing violence in our communities from over 25 organizations.

    Brenda Muhammad has used the many opportunities afforded her to advance the concept that the greatest contribution a survivor or victim can make is to ensure that another individual not experience that same pain. She believes that this can only happen when each of us turns our pain into participation.