• SUGGESTED HEAT ADVISORY GUIDELINES When Local Temperatures Exceed 90 Degrees

     

    Atlanta Public Schools promotes healthy student activities that include opportunities for outdoor physical activity. Consistent with this commitment, we have compiled guidelines for decision-making when local weather may harm our students and staff's health and safety.  The guidelines below, provided by the American Academy of Pediatrics, are intended to provide preventive strategies that may limit or reverse certain activities for physical education and other outdoor activities before, during, and after school.

    Each school should determine the criteria for such a decision and who will make the judgment call at the local school. The decision-making process may vary from grade to grade. To view local heat/weather advisories, please visit: Atlanta Heat/Weather Maps

    Conditions to consider 

    • Temperature
    • Humidity 
    • Heat Index 
    • Age of students 
    • Length of time outside 
    • Is the area being used shaded? 

    The Most Common Signs and Symptoms of  Heat Exhaustion

    • Confusion
    • Dark-colored urine (a sign of dehydration)
    • Dizziness
    • Fainting
    • Fatigue
    • Headache
    • Muscle or abdominal cramps
    • Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea
    • Pale skin
    • Profuse sweating
    • Rapid heartbeat

      Recess and Physical Activity Guidelines

      • Recess and Physical Activity Guidelines

        1. Temperatures may feel hotter than the actual degrees indicated. When the temperature reaches 95 degrees or above, principals should reconsider outside student recess, physical education classes, and field trips and provide for inside physical activity in an air-conditioned environment. 
        2. Teachers should give students a water break before and after recess. Also, monitor students and if one shows signs of heat exhaustion or overheating. Students should be hydrated before going outside and have access to drinking water while outside. In activities lasting longer than 30 minutes, periodic water breaks should be incorporated (approximately every 10 minutes or as needed).
        3. Teachers need to be aware of medical conditions such as asthma, epilepsy, allergies, medications taken, etc. which place students at higher risks for heat-related issues. These conditions may be intensified in hot weather.

        Air Quality Index should also be considered when making decisions about outdoor activity. Please click the following link for Local Air Quality Conditions: https://airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=airnow.local_city&zipcode=30303&submit=Go

      Physical Education Classes

      • Physical Education Classes 

        1. When the heat index reaches the 90s, physical education classes should remain indoors if possible. Remember, temperatures may feel hotter than the actual degrees indicated.
        2. Frequent water breaks should be allowed while students are participating in physical activity. Students should have access to water as needed.
        3. Teachers should be aware of medical conditions such as asthma, epilepsy, allergies, medications taken, etc., which place students at higher risks for heat-related issues. These conditions may be intensified in hot weather.

      • During the school year, on days that exceed 95 degrees or above, schools should be on alert regarding a Heat Advisory. Please see chart below for activity limitations and recommendations.

        Heat Index

        Category

        Activity Limitations

        Less than 80

        ----------

        No limitations

        80 to 90

        Caution

        Encourage hydration. 75% vigorous activity/25% light activity or rest

        90 to 104

        Extreme Caution

        Enforce hydration. 50% vigorous activity/50% light activity or rest. Sunstroke, heat cramps, and heat exhaustion are possible.

        105 to 129

        Danger

        Enforce hydration. 25% vigorous activity/75% light activity or rest. Sunstroke, heat cramps, and heat exhaustion are likely. Heat stroke is possible.

        130 or higher

        Extreme Danger

        All nonessential outdoor activities are canceled.