• Chronic Illnesses that Impact Our Students

  • Chronic conditions are health problems that last a long time and can make students feel sick or tired. These conditions can make it hard for students to do well in school and feel good each day. 

    Common Chronic Conditions in Students

    • Asthma: Makes it hard to breathe.
    • Diabetes: Affects how the body uses sugar.
    • Seizures: Causes sudden changes in the brain's activity. 

    Why It's Important to Manage Chronic Conditions

    If these conditions are not addressed, students might miss a lot of school, find it hard to learn, and not feel well enough to participate in activities with their friends.

    How Schools and Parents Can Help

    Schools and parents should collaborate to help students with chronic conditions. Together, they can make special plans to keep these students healthy and help them do their best in school. By working together, they can ensure that students feel better and succeed.

Learn More about Common Chronic Illnesses Below.

      Diabetes

      • Overview of Diabetes

        Diabetes is a condition that affects how the body uses sugar, which is important for energy. When someone has diabetes, their body can't use sugar properly, leading to high blood sugar levels.

         

        Types of Diabetes:

        There are two main types of diabetes:

        • Type 1 Diabetes: The body doesn't make insulin, a hormone that helps use sugar for energy. People with Type 1 Diabetes need to take insulin every day. 
        • Type 2 Diabetes: The body has trouble using insulin properly, leading to high blood sugar levels. There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but eating healthily, exercising, and sometimes taking medicine can help manage it. 

        Symptoms of Diabetes: 

        • Increased Thirst: Feeling very thirsty often.
        • Frequent Urination: Needing to use the bathroom a lot. 
        • Hunger: Feeling very hungry even after eating. 
        • Fatigue: Feeling very tired. 
        • Blurred Vision: Having trouble seeing clearly. 

        Causes of Diabetes

        • Genetic Factors: Diabetes can run in families. 
        • Lifestyle Factors: For Type 2 Diabetes, being overweight and not getting enough exercise can increase the risk. 

        Preventive Measures

        • Type 2 Diabetes: Healthy lifestyle choices can help prevent type 2 diabetes. Eating healthy foods, staying active, and keeping a healthy weight are important. These choices can also help if someone has prediabetes. Prediabetes is when a person's blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. It means the body is starting to have trouble using sugar properly. If not managed, prediabetes can turn into type 2 diabetes. However, with healthy eating, regular exercise, and maintaining a healthy weight, prediabetes can be reversed!

        Managing Diabetes

        • Medicine: People with diabetes may need to take insulin or other medicine. 
        • Monitoring Blood Sugar: Checking blood sugar levels regularly helps manage diabetes. 
        • Healthy Lifestyle: Eating well, staying alive, and getting enough sleep are important. 

        Helping Your Child at School

        • Communication: Talk to your child's school so teachers and staff know about their diabetes status and what to do if there's an emergency. 
        • Submit a Medical Health Packet: Submit a yearly Medical Health Packet to the school nurse to make a plan that includes medicine and emergency steps. The form can be found here: https://www.atlantapublicschools.us/Page/44408
        • Education: Help your child understand their condition and teach them how to explain it to others. 

        Additional Resources:

      Seizures/Epilepsy

      • Understanding Epilepsy

        Epilepsy is a condition that affects the brain and causes people to have seizures. A seizure is like a sudden burst of electricity in the brain that can make people act differently, move differently, or even become unconscious. 

        Types of Seizures

        • Generalized Seizures: These affect the whole brain and can make someone lose consciousness, jerk, or stiffen. 
        • Focal Seizures: These start in one part of the brain and can cause strange feelings, behaviors, or movements. 

        Causes of Epilepsy

        • Family history: Sometimes, epilepsy runs in the family. 
        • Head injuries: Accidents or sports injuries can cause epilepsy. 
        • Illness: Infections or other health problems can lead to epilepsy. 

        Preventive Measures

        • Injury Prevention: Wearing helmets during sports can help prevent head injuries that might cause epilepsy. 
        • Healthy Habits: Getting enough sleep, eating healthily, and managing stress can help reduce the risk of seizures. 

        Managing Epilepsy

        • Medicine: Many people with epilepsy take medicine to help prevent seizures.
        • Doctor Visits: Going to the doctor regularly helps manage the condition.
        • Emergency Plan: Knowing what to do during a seizure can keep your child safe.

        Helping Your Child at School

        • Communication: Talk to your child’s school so teachers and staff are aware of their epilepsy and what to do if a seizure occurs.
        • Submit a Medical Health Packet: Submit a yearly Medical Health Packet to the school nurse to make a plan that includes medicine and emergency steps. The form can be found here: https://www.atlantapublicschools.us/Page/44408
        • Education: Help your child understand their condition and teach them how to explain it to others.

        Additional Resources

      Asthma

      • Understanding Asthma

        Asthma is a condition that affects the lungs and makes breathing difficult. It can cause wheezing, coughing, and shortness of breath. Asthma can be triggered by allergies, exercise, or cold air. 

        Symptoms of Asthma

        • Wheezing: A whistling sound when breathing.
        • Coughing: Especially at night or early in the morning.
        • Shortness of Breath: Feeling like you can't get enough air.
        • Chest Tightness: Feeling like something is squeezing your chest.

        Causes of Asthma

        • Allergies: Things like pollen, dust, or pet hair can trigger asthma.
        • Exercise: Physical activity can make asthma worse for some people.
        • Cold Air: Breathing in cold air can cause asthma symptoms.
        • Infections: Colds or respiratory infections can trigger asthma

        Preventive Measures

        • Avoid Triggers: Stay away from things that make asthma worse, like smoke or strong smells.
        • Use Inhalers: These medicines help open up the airways and make breathing easier.
        • Stay Healthy: Eating well, getting enough sleep, and exercising can help manage asthma.

        Helping Your Child at School

        • Communication: Talk to your child’s school so teachers and staff are aware of their asthma and what to do if an attack happens.
        • Submit a Medical Health Packet: Submit a yearly Medical Health Packet to the school nurse to make a plan that includes medicine and emergency steps. The form can be found here: https://www.atlantapublicschools.us/Page/44408
        • Education: Help your child understand their asthma and teach them how to explain it to others.

        Additional Resources